Search results for old money

We've found 380 phrases for old money:Sort:PopularA - Z


Whos Youre Old Man?Common Question Addressed to Children Instead of; "Whom is Your Father, Daddy, or DAD"Rate it:

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you can't put an old head on young shouldersYoung people inevitably lack the experience and wisdom which come with age.Rate it:

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you can't teach an old dog new tricksIt is impossible, or almost impossible, to change people's habits or traits or mindset.Rate it:

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you're never too old to learnIt is possible to learn new things, at any age; (implying) follow your desires and dreamsRate it:

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a penny saved is a penny earnedA maxim for thrift that says that money not spent may be spent later, or may earn interest in the meantimeRate it:

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if they sold it to you, you paid too muchEven when you perceive a good deal, someone is making money off you.Rate it:

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pay forTo exchange for, especially money for goods or services.Rate it:

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pay outTo distribute money; to disburse.Rate it:

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vale of tearsA symbolic "valley of tears"; meaning the world and the sorrows felt through life. Similar to the Old Testament Psalm 23's reference to the "valley of the shadow of death", the phrase implies that sadness is part of the physical world (i.e. part of human experience).Rate it:

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behind the timesOut of date; old-fashioned; obsolete; outmoded; outdated.Rate it:

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bail outTo secure the release of an arrested person by providing bail money.Rate it:

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put asideTo save money.Rate it:

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break evenTo neither gain nor lose money.Rate it:

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greenbackGreenback is a slang term for money. Usually for american dollars.Rate it:

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spring forTo pay for; to offer money.Rate it:

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travel junkieWho are using their time and money to seek out adventure holidays and travel.Rate it:

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cold hands, warm heart; dirty feet, no sweetheart!A few old timer's "fun" way to compliment a lady & to find out if she could be courted.Rate it:

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cough upTo pay money.Rate it:

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bring inTo earn money for a company or for the family.Rate it:

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measure twice and cut once(literally, carpentry) One should double-check one's measurements for accuracy before cutting a piece of wood; otherwise it may be necessary to cut again, wasting time and material.1872, "Dressmaking," Hall's Journal of Health, vol. 19, no. 12, p. 280:Look at Carpenters! . . . In old times it was a proverb "Measure twice, and cut once."(figuratively, by extension) Plan and prepare in a careful, thorough manner before taking action.2008, Hilary Johnson, "Mergers rattle bank relations," Financial Week, 9 Nov. (retrieved 9 Nov. 2008):Mr. Paz noted that since the onset of the credit crisis, eBay, like other companies, hasnRate it:

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put byTo save money.Rate it:

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put downTo pay an initial amount of money on a large purchase.Rate it:

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square upTo pay back money that is owed.Rate it:

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throw enough mud at the wall, some of it will stickTry the same thing (or similar things) often enough, and, even if the general standard is poor, sometimes one will be successful.2001, And still no one is shouting stop. read in The Kingdom archives at on 02 Nov 06,Many team managers are of the philosophy that if you throw enough mud at the wall some of it will stick. They believe that team preparation is all about physical fitness. They run the players into the ground and they believe they will be "flying on the day".2001, Robert McCrum, Let them eat cake, in The Observer 16 Dec 01, read on Guardian Unlimited site at on 02 Nov 06,Australian publishing boomed and in the past 10 years the country's literary culture has undergone a mini golden age, capped by Carey's triumph at the 2001 Booker Prize. As one Australian arts administrator said to me many years ago: 'Listen, mate, if you throw enough mud at the wall, some of it will stick.'2001, Chris Collin, Re: 2-cp speys on The Strathspey Server mailing list archive at on 02 Nov 06,I am finding that "if you throw enough mud at the wall, some of it will stick". It doesn't always work of course (especially on the nights when the class is mostly the beginners), but the class seems to thrive on the challange.2005, Ray Craft (poster on The right scale blog), Fitzhooie and his Burden, read at on 02 Nov 06,Prosecutors everywhere have bad habits of overcharging lots of cases, knowing that if the throw enough mud at the wall some of it will stick.2005, Sean Kelleher, Spike Milligan: His part in our downfall in Business 07 Aug 05, read at on 02 Nov 06,As long as there is negligible regulation and enforcement anyone can actually try and do the job...Weak regulation allows the industry to build strategies on full time recruitment. The theory goes: throw enough mud at the wall, some of it will stick.c2005, Everything You've Learned About Marketing Is Wrong, read on LINC Performance website at on 02 Nov 06,They have the money to continue to believe in the repetition side of the equation. You throw enough mud at the wall, some of it will stick. But it still isnRate it:

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cash cowSomeone or something which is a dependable source of appreciable amounts of money; a moneymaker.Rate it:

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a golden key can open any doorSufficient money can accomplish anything.Rate it:

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before someone's timeFrom before one was born or old enough to be aware of the world.Rate it:

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burn a hole in one's pocketTo cause someone to be tempted to spend money.Rate it:

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make a killingTo win or earn a large amount of money.Rate it:

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sticks and stonesEvocative of the saying "sticks and stones may (or will) break my bones, but words (or names) will never hurt (or harm) me".1957, Brendan Gill, The Day the Money StoppedRate it:

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oat operaA, film, or novel depicting adventures of characters in the American Old West; a western.Rate it:

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a leopard cannot change its spotsOne cannot change one's own nature.1597, William Shakespeare, Richard II Act i, Scene 1 (First Folio):King. Lyons make Leopards tame.Mowbray. Yea but not change his ?pots.1611, King James Version of the Bible, Jeremiah 13:23:Can the Ethiopian change his skin, or the leopard his spots?1820, Walter Scott, Ivanhoe Chapter 32:End now all unkindness. Let us put the Jew to ransom, since the leopard will not change his spots, and a Jew he will continue to be.1918, Johnston McCulley, Thubway Tham's Inthane Moment:The leopard cannot change his spots, old boy.Rate it:

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a rey muerto, rey puestoout with the old, in with the newRate it:

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age outTo become too old for an activity, program or institution; to become too mature for a behavior.Rate it:

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anaconda mortgageA loan arrangement in which all of the money borrowed from a lender, for whatever purpose, is secured by one's home, land, and other property.Rate it:

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ape leaderAn old maid.Rate it:

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bang up coveA dashing fellow who spends his money freely.Rate it:

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bank nightAn event where patrons are enticed to buy entry tickets into some venue, for example a movie theater, with the anticipation that they will be entered into a drawing to win an amount of money if their ticket is drawn and they are on-site at the time of the winning.Rate it:

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basket houseA cafe or similar establishment where musical performances are given and the performers are then paid with money placed in a basket by members of the audience.Rate it:

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bet outTo be the first in a round to put money in the pot.Rate it:

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big bucksLots of money.Rate it:

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big ol'Alternative spelling of big old.Rate it:

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big oleAlternative spelling of big old.Rate it:

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blood is thicker than waterFamily relations and loyalties are stronger than relationships with people who are not family members.1866, Anthony Trollope, The Belton Estate, ch. 30,Blood is thicker than water, is it not? If cousins are not friends, who can be?circa 1915, Lucy Fitch Perkins, The Scotch Twins, ch. 5,The old clans are scattered now, but blood is thicker than water still, and you're welcome to the fireside of your kinsman!Rate it:

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blow one's wadTo spend all of one's money.Rate it:

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book dumpingThe practice of donating old used books that burden rather than assist communities.Rate it:

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bottom lineThe final balance; the amount of money or profit left after everything has been tallied.Rate it:

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break the bankTo win more money than is available to be paid.Rate it:

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bring backTo reenact an old rule or law.Rate it:

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bring homeTo earn (money)Rate it:

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