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We've found 186 phrases for phrase:Sort:PopularA - Z


stock phraseA phrase frequently or habitually used by a person or group, and thus associated with them.Rate it:

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turn a phraseTo create a particular linguistic expression which is strikingly clear, appropriate, and memorable.Rate it:

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turn of phraseAn artful phrasing of words.Rate it:

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"never mind your mother sonny.... eat your bleedin' orange"I worked with a man from Foulridge, Lancashire for over 35 years who often used this phrase whenever there was a problem and he wasn't sure of the answer!.. Said the phrase came from a "chap I used to work with in Colne... but he didn't know what it meant either"Rate it:

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eff offA censored form of the phrase f** off.Rate it:

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tempus fugittime flies (used as an alternative to this phrase)."Meanwhile, the irreplaceable time escapes", expressing concern that one's limited time is being consumed by something which may have little intrinsic substance or importance at that moment.Rate it:

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vale of tearsA symbolic "valley of tears"; meaning the world and the sorrows felt through life. Similar to the Old Testament Psalm 23's reference to the "valley of the shadow of death", the phrase implies that sadness is part of the physical world (i.e. part of human experience).Rate it:

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you know whatA phrase used to get someone's attention before announcing something.Rate it:

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à qui tu le disS’emploie quand une personne a entendu une phrase qu’elle était mieux placée pour dire elle-même.Rate it:

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kiss my gritsA nice way of saying "eff you." Its a spin on the phrase "kiss my a**", written into a TV show from the 80s called "Alice". The saying was usually preceded by the name "Mel" who was the owner of the diner where Flo, the waitress who made the saying famous, worked.Rate it:

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blame canadaA catch phrase for shifting attention away from a serious social issue by laying responsibility with Canada.Rate it:

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lay downTo sacrifice, especially in the phrase "to lay down one's life.".Rate it:

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rag-chewingA phrase used by morse code operators for a longer than usual conversation, generally a conversation extending about 30 minutes.Rate it:

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till death do us partA common phrase said between the bride and the groom at a Christian wedding, indicating togetherness and commitment.Rate it:

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à consommer de préférence avantPhrase suivie de la mention de la date limite d’utilisation optimale, indiquée sur l’emballage de certains produits alimentaires tels que les conserves, les produits d’épicerie, le café, les produits surgelés, etc.Rate it:

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à tes amoursPhrase que l’on dit à une personne qui vient d’éternuer pour la deuxième fois d’affilée.Rate it:

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after Saturday comes SundayA phrase sometimes attributed to fundamentalist Muslims, implying that they wish to kill the Jews, whose sabbath is Saturday, and then the Christians, whose sabbath is Sunday.Rate it:

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age before beautyA phrase said to allow older people to go before younger ones.Rate it:

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and his motherServes as an intensifier for an inclusive noun or phrase such as everyone, anyone, each someone or all someones.Rate it:

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Appendix:Snowclones/with great X, comes great YStates a causation in which Y follows X. Often, this phrase is used in a solemn tone, employed sarcastically for minor things that are not nearly as serious as suggested.Rate it:

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Appendix:Snowclones/X, thy name is YUsed to say that something or somebody embodies a particular quality, usually a negative one. This phrase is said using this format: "X, thy name is Y", where X is the quality and Y is the person or thing with that quality.Rate it:

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as they sayA vague invocation of popular convention when introducing a phrase or expression, which may be accompanied by attribution to a source or locale in which the phrase or expression is used.Rate it:

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baby on boardPhrase on a sign attached to the rear of a motor car to signify that a baby is sometimes carried.Rate it:

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big in japana phrase to describe Western celebrities that have been successful in JapanRate it:

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blanket termA word or phrase that is used to describe multiple groups of related things. The degree of relation may vary. Blanket terms often trade specificity for ease-of-use; in other words, a blanket term by itself gives little detail about the things that it describes or the relationships between them, but is easy to say and remember. Blanket terms often originate as slang, and eventually become integrated into the general vocabulary.Rate it:

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buy the rumor, sell the factA phrase often cited by stock traders that explains price declines that occur after an anticipated positive event has happened.Rate it:

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c'est de l'hébreuit's all Greek to me, a phrase indicating that something's impossible to understand.Rate it:

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c'est du chinoisit's all Greek to me, a phrase indicating that something is impossible to understand.Rate it:

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c'est du russeit's all Greek to me, a phrase indicating that something is impossible to understand.Rate it:

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c'était le bon tempsPhrase utilisé pour parler d'une époque révolue, souvent que le locuteur a connue lui-même, avec nostalgie, souvent pour indiquer que le temps présent est moins agréable que cette époque.Rate it:

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ça va pas la têtePhrase utilisée pour reprendre quelqu’un dont on considère qu’il a des idées saugrenues ou dangereuses, ou qu’il a commis un acte répréhensible.Rate it:

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ce qu’il fallait démontrerPhrase mise à la fin d'une démonstration.Rate it:

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ceci étantLes choses étant ainsi. Note : Généralement en début de phrase, et suivi d’une virgule.Rate it:

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chestnut(Often "old chestnut") A worn-out meme; a phrase, etc. so often repeated as to have grown tiresome.Rate it:

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cloud nineA state of happiness, elation or bliss; often used in the phrase on cloud nine.Rate it:

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come to papaA phrase used to encourage someone or something to approach.Rate it:

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comme quoiA phrase used to say that: this recent fact or result confirms what we always thought. : it goes to showRate it:

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computer says noA popular phrase for an attitude in customer service in which the default response is to check with information stored or generated electronically and then make decisions based on that, apparently without using common sense, and showing a level of unhelpfulness whereby more could be done to reach a mutually satisfactory outcome, but is not.Rate it:

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coug itTo suddenly lose a contest through reversal of fortune, mistakes, or bad judgment. The phrase is analogous to "blow it", or "snatch defeat from the jaws of victory".Rate it:

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crab mentalityA way of thinking best described by the phrase "if I can't have it, neither can you." The metaphor refers to a pot of crabs in which one tries to escape over the side, but is relentlessly pulled down by the others in the pot.Rate it:

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crepi il lupoResponse to the phrase in bocca al lupo!.Rate it:

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c’est assez, dit la baleine, je me cache à l’eau car j’ai le dos finPhrase destinée à retenir facilement le nom des cétacés car elle évoque phonétiquement cétacé dit la baleine, je me cachalot car j’ai le dauphin.Rate it:

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c’est pas fauxUtilisé pour se moquer d'une personne parlant de notions relativement complexes, en tournant en dérision ce qu'elle vient de dire. Cette phrase est régulièrement prononcée dans la série française Kaamelott, en particulier par le personnage de Perceval, pour donner le change lorsque son interlocuteur emploie des notions qui le dépassent ; son utilisation dans des situations les plus incongrues en a fait un gimmick représentant la série et l'a faite entrer dans le langage courant comme une plaisanterie récurrente.Rate it:

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do not pass go, do not collect $200A phrase telling someone to pursue a path directly without deviations.Rate it:

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do not pass go, do not collect £200A phrase telling someone to pursue a path directly without deviations.Rate it:

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do you come here oftenA common phrase for initiating conversation with a stranger, especially one for seeking romantic involvement.Rate it:

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dog in the huntThis is often used erroneously to indicate that one has no stake in the outcome. As such this is a bastardization of two Southern idioms: "no dog in the fight," and "that dog won't hunt." (The latter indicates something is a bad idea or prone to fail.) Use of the phrase "no dog in the hunt" when one wishes to indicate they have no "dog in the fight" will generate funny glances from any Southerners who overhear it.Rate it:

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don't do anything I wouldn't doA phrase, often used jocularly, to give vague advice upon parting.Rate it:

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donde dije digo, digo DiegoA phrase used by the speaker when rectifying something they had previously said, claiming it was mispronounced or misinterpretedRate it:

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double entendreA phrase that has two meanings, especially where one is innocent and literal, the other risqué, bawdy, or ironic; an innuendo..Rate it:

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