Search results for ruffle some feathers

We've found 225 phrases for ruffle some feathers:Sort:PopularA - Z


the dogs bark, but the caravan goes onLife goes on, even if some will try to stop or talk against progress.Rate it:

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the early bird gets the wormWhoever arrives first has the best chance of success; some opportunities are only available to the first competitors.Rate it:

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the pants offAn intensifier used with some transitive action verbs to indicate that the action is performed with thoroughness, vigor, or complete success.Rate it:

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there is nothing new under the sunThere is nothing truly novel in existence. Every new idea has some sort of precedent or echo from the past.Rate it:

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three skips of a louseSaid about some trifling or insignificant matter.Rate it:

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timing is everythingConsideration of other events can greatly influence some desired outcome (such as an audience laughing to a comedian's joke).Telling the old joke about a butt-crack was not a good idea, just as the plumber arrived, Bob.You know what they say: "timing is everything." I'm sure we can find another plumber before the house floods.Rate it:

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to bootSome variations in usage remain archaic. Old English, Middle English: to help, in addition.Rate it:

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tomorrow is another dayTomorrow will bring new opportunities and a fresh start for one's endeavors.1600, author unknown, "Phillidaes Love-call to her Coridon, and his replying" (song), in England's Helicon, printed at London by I.R. for John Flasket:Phil. Yonder comes my Mother, Coridon,whether shall I flie?Cor. Under yonder Beech my lovely one,while she passeth by.Say to her thy true-Love was not heere,remember, remember,to morrow is another day:1896, Amelia E. Barr, A Knight of the Nets, ch. 8:"Well, well, my dear lass, to-night we cannot work, but we may sleep. . . . Keep a still heart tonight, and tomorrow is another day."1936, Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind, ch. 63:"Tomorrow, I'll think of some way to get him back. After all, tomorrow is another day."2005, Fran Schumer, "JERSEY: In Princeton, Taking On Harvard's Fuss About Women," New York Times, 19 June (retrieved 18 Aug. 2009):"Half of me is depressedRate it:

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toss-upThe toss of a coin used to decide some issue.Rate it:

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Tweedledum and TweedledeeTwo persons or organizations deemed indistinguishable in some way.Rate it:

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two heads are better than oneSome problems may be solved more easily by two (or more) people working together than by one working alone.Rate it:

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under erasureOf a bit of text, written and strickenthrough; hence, figuratively in some sense both present and absent.Rate it:

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unwashed massesOf people who are considered by someone to be somehow uneducated, uninformed, godless, or in some other way unqualified for inclusion in the speaker's elite circles.Rate it:

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up-and-comerSomeone who is up-and-coming, who has begun to be successful in some field and is likely to become even more successful in the future.Rate it:

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washed outOf clothes. When they lose some of their original colour from being washed so often.Rate it:

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well and goodBasically good, but with some shortcoming or limitation.Rate it:

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what goes around comes aroundThe status eventually returns to its original value after completing some sort of cycle.A person's actions, whether good or bad, will often have consequences for that person.Rate it:

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when, as, and ifUsed to indicate the timing and contingency of some obligation in contracts, especially financial.Rate it:

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where there's smoke, there's fireIf there is telltale evidence of some event, the event is probably occurring.Rate it:

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widow-makerSomething which or someone who takes the lives of men; a hazard that affects mostly men or is specific for some trade, occupied mostly by men.Rate it:

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will doAffirmative yes in response to an especially personal or direct request for the performance of some action.Rate it:

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with a grain of saltWith a bit of common sense and skepticism. Generally used in some form of to take with a grain of salt.Rate it:

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work atTo make a physical or mental effort to progress some specified task.Rate it:

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you can't unring a bellSome things can't be undone.Rate it:

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you wishUsed to express the speaker's skepticism about a preceding statement concerning some desired or assumed state of affairs.Rate it:

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