Search results for a great deal

We've found 172 phrases for a great deal:Sort:PopularA - Z


balls-outExtreme, extremely greatRate it:

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balls-outWith great abandon.Rate it:

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be a manTo put up with something or take responsibility for it; to deal with something, such as pain or misfortune, without complaining.Rate it:

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beddable[...] feminine, great body great legs great taste, trained and beddable, Jesus, how beddable.Rate it:

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bend over backwardsTo make a great effort; to take extraordinary care; to go to great lengths.Rate it:

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BFDbig deal. (initialism for big fucking deal)Rate it:

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big wheelA person with a great deal of power or influence, especially a high-ranking person in an organization.Rate it:

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bright shiny objectAn item that attracts a great deal of attention because of its superficial characteristics.Rate it:

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build a better mousetrapTo invent the next great thing; to have a better idea.Rate it:

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bullyGood, Great, sonderful: British ejaculation!Rate it:

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busted flushAnything which ends up worthless despite great potential.Rate it:

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cakewalkSomething that is easy or simple, or that does not present a great challenge.Rate it:

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call off the dogsTo ease up on after inflicting great punishment.Rate it:

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catbird seatExpression used to describe an enviable position, often one of great advantage.Rate it:

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come to gripsTo confront or deal with directly.Rate it:

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come to grips withTo confront or deal with directly; to commence a confrontation.Rate it:

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coming out of one's earsIn great or excess quantity.Rate it:

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company manA male employee who has a great-and often, in the view of others, an excessive-commitment to serving the interests of the organization which employs him.Rate it:

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country mileA long way, a great distance.Rate it:

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crawl withTo include or be covered with swarms or large numbers of (something, especially insects or people); to have in great numbers or multitudes.Rate it:

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cross that bridge when one comes to itTo deal with a problem or situation only when it arises.Rate it:

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do right byTo treat, deal with, or act toward (someone) in a morally just, socially honorable fashion.Rate it:

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dog racismPaying large sum of money for "pedigree dogs", attaching great importance to the breed of a pet.Rate it:

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don't make a big production out of this!Over emphasized, blown out of proportion, made it into a big deal, made it appear as a movie!Rate it:

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el doradoplace of great richesRate it:

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f** itAn expression of great indifference or nonchalance.Rate it:

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f**ing hellAn exclamation of great surprise.Rate it:

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far and wideOver a great distance, or large area; nearly everywhere.Rate it:

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feed a cold, starve a feverEating more will cure the common cold, and eating less will cure a fever.1887, J. H. Whelan, "The Treatment of Colds.", The Practitioner, vol. 38, pg. 180:"Feed a cold, starve a fever." There is a deal of wisdom in the first part of this advice. A person with a catarrh should take an abundance of light nutritious food, and some light wine, but avoid spirits, and above all tobacco.1968, Katinka Loeser, The Archers at Home, publ. Atheneum, New York, pg. 60:I have a cold. 'Feed a cold, starve a fever.' You certainly know that.2009, Shelly Reuben, Tabula Rasa, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, ISBN 015101079X, pg. 60:They say feed a cold, starve a fever, but they don't tell you what to do when you got both, so I figured scrambled eggs, tea, and toast.Rate it:

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fiddle while Rome burnsTo neglect helping when one's time is needed most; to ignore the major problem at hand (whilst doing something less important); to be idle, inactive, or uninterested in a time of great need.Rate it:

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field dayA great time or a great deal to do, at somebody else's expense.Rate it:

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field dayA great time or a great deal to do.Rate it:

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fight firesTo deal with urgent matters and minor emergencies rather than longer-term work.Rate it:

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first things firstDeal with matters of highest priority first; deal with matters in logical sequence.1922, H. G. Wells, The Secret Places of the Heart, ch.4,"First things first," said Sir Richmond. If we set about getting fuel sanely, if we do it as the deliberate, co-operative act of the whole species, then it follows that we shall look very closely into the use that is being made of it.1999, Frank Pellegrini, "House Republicans Quell Mutiny Over Tax Bounty," Time, 23 Jul.,Judging by the pollsRate it:

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forewarned is forearmedAdvance awareness of a situation, especially a risky one, prepares one to deal with it.1863, Charles Reade, Hard Cash, ch. 4:[W]hatever a young gentleman of that age says to you, he says to many other ladies; but your experience is not equal to your sense; so profit by mine . . . forewarned is forearmed.1885, G. A. Henty, Saint George for England, ch. 4:Sometimes, they say, it is wiser to remain in ignorance; at other times forewarned is forearmed.circa 1903, Lucy Maud Montgomery, "Why Mr. Cropper Changed His Mind":"Well, Miss Maxwell, I think it only fair to tell you that you may have trouble with those boys when they do come. Forewarned is forearmed, you know."Rate it:

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fuck itAn expression of great indifference or nonchalance.Rate it:

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fucking hellAn exclamation of great surprise.Rate it:

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get down to brass tacksDeal with the important details.Rate it:

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get to grips withTo deal (with something) decisively, or to confront (it) head on.Rate it:

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go over someone's headTo take up an issue with another person's boss or other superior rather than beginning or continuing to deal with the original person.Rate it:

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go through the roofA dramatic physical or emotional reaction or tirade to any of these. A disappointment, a great omission or error, an unnecessary loss due to inattention or carelessness.Rate it:

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golden gooseSomething that generates much profit or gives great advantages.Rate it:

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hand over fistQuickly or in great quantity, especially in reference to earning money.Rate it:

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hangar queenAn aircraft which requires a great deal of regular maintenance and has an unfavorable ratio of maintenance time to flight time.Rate it:

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hard nut to crackA situation, person, group, etc. which is difficult to overcome or deal with.Rate it:

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have the world by the tailTo possess great influence and opportunity.Rate it:

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hell to payVery unpleasant consequences; a great deal of trouble.Rate it:

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hit homeTo do something particularly great.Rate it:

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hit it bigTo have great success.Rate it:

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hold forthTalk at great length; expatiate; harangue.Rate it:

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