Search results for a great deal

We've found 172 phrases for a great deal:Sort:PopularA - Z


a good dealVery much; to a great extent; a lot; lots.Rate it:

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a good dealA large amount; a lot.Rate it:

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a great dealVery much; to a great extent; a lot; lots.Rate it:

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a lotvery much; a great deal; to a large extent.Rate it:

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a page turnerA story, a book, an article of great interest can become a page turner.Rate it:

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a whopper-dooperPrize Winning, Top Banana, First Rate, First Class, Winner, Great, Glorious, Grand, Super Duper. Superlative.Rate it:

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Aaron's beardA common name for several plants, which have tufts of stamens.[First attested in the late 19 century.]Cymbalaria muralis (ivy-leaved toadflax, Kenilworth ivy)Hypericum calycinum (great St. John's-wort, Jerusalem star)Saxifraga stolonifera (creeping saxifrage, strawberry geranium)Opuntia leucotricha (arborescent prickly pear, Aaron's beard cactus)Rate it:

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Aaron's beardHypericum calycinum (great St. John's-wort, Jerusalem star)Rate it:

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Aaron's beardHypericum calycinum (great St. John's-wort, Jerusalem star)Rate it:

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abound inTo have something in great numbers or quantities; to possess in such abundance as to be characterized by.Rate it:

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abound withTo have something in great numbers or quantities; to possess in such abundance as to be characterized by.Rate it:

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all hell broke looseA great disaster happened or chaos ensued.Rate it:

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balls-outExtreme, extremely greatRate it:

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balls-outWith great abandon.Rate it:

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be a manTo put up with something or take responsibility for it; to deal with something, such as pain or misfortune, without complaining.Rate it:

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beat downTo strike with great force.Rate it:

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beddable[...] feminine, great body great legs great taste, trained and beddable, Jesus, how beddable.Rate it:

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bend over backwardsTo make a great effort; to take extraordinary care; to go to great lengths.Rate it:

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BFDbig deal. (initialism for big fucking deal)Rate it:

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big dealSomething very important, difficult, or of concern.Rate it:

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big wheelA person with a great deal of power or influence, especially a high-ranking person in an organization.Rate it:

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bright shiny objectAn item that attracts a great deal of attention because of its superficial characteristics.Rate it:

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build a better mousetrapTo invent the next great thing; to have a better idea.Rate it:

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bullyGood, Great, sonderful: British ejaculation!Rate it:

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busted flushAnything which ends up worthless despite great potential.Rate it:

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cakewalkSomething that is easy or simple, or that does not present a great challenge.Rate it:

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call off the dogsTo ease up on after inflicting great punishment.Rate it:

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catbird seatExpression used to describe an enviable position, often one of great advantage.Rate it:

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come to gripsTo confront or deal with directly.Rate it:

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come to grips withTo confront or deal with directly; to commence a confrontation.Rate it:

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coming out of one's earsIn great or excess quantity.Rate it:

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company manA male employee who has a great-and often, in the view of others, an excessive-commitment to serving the interests of the organization which employs him.Rate it:

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country mileA long way, a great distance.Rate it:

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crawl withTo include or be covered with swarms or large numbers of (something, especially insects or people); to have in great numbers or multitudes.Rate it:

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cross that bridge when one comes to itTo deal with a problem or situation only when it arises.Rate it:

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cut a dealA Special Arrangement, Contract, Agreement, Permission, Bargain Price, 'Good Deal'.Rate it:

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deal breakerTo fail.Rate it:

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deal withpunishRate it:

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do right byTo treat, deal with, or act toward (someone) in a morally just, socially honorable fashion.Rate it:

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dog racismPaying large sum of money for "pedigree dogs", attaching great importance to the breed of a pet.Rate it:

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don't make a big production out of this!Over emphasized, blown out of proportion, made it into a big deal, made it appear as a movie!Rate it:

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done dealAn agreement that has been finally resolved or decided.Rate it:

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drug dealUsed other than as an idiom: see drug, deal.Rate it:

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drug dealAn illegal business transaction where cash or something else of value is exchanged for illegal drugs, usually conducted in a clandestine manner.Rate it:

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el doradoplace of great richesRate it:

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every silver lining has a cloudEvery good situation has the potential to turn bad.2007, Diab A. Shetayh, Actuality : The Reality RequiemA great partnership isn't a self-maintaining entity. Perseverance and persistence make it thrive. For every silver lining has a cloud. Ignorance of this reality is not an option.Rate it:

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f** itAn expression of great indifference or nonchalance.Rate it:

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f**ing hellAn exclamation of great surprise.Rate it:

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far and wideOver a great distance, or large area; nearly everywhere.Rate it:

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feed a cold, starve a feverEating more will cure the common cold, and eating less will cure a fever.1887, J. H. Whelan, "The Treatment of Colds.", The Practitioner, vol. 38, pg. 180:"Feed a cold, starve a fever." There is a deal of wisdom in the first part of this advice. A person with a catarrh should take an abundance of light nutritious food, and some light wine, but avoid spirits, and above all tobacco.1968, Katinka Loeser, The Archers at Home, publ. Atheneum, New York, pg. 60:I have a cold. 'Feed a cold, starve a fever.' You certainly know that.2009, Shelly Reuben, Tabula Rasa, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, ISBN 015101079X, pg. 60:They say feed a cold, starve a fever, but they don't tell you what to do when you got both, so I figured scrambled eggs, tea, and toast.Rate it:

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