Search results for take by storm

We've found 436 phrases for take by storm:Sort:PopularA - Z


take by stormTo capture by means of a sudden, overwhelming attack.Rate it:

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take by stormTo seize, overpower, or captivate in a sudden and forceful manner.Rate it:

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take by stormTo rapidly gain great popularity in (a place).Rate it:

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on a cloudy day i saw a rainbow, on the day i saw you , you gave a stormOn better days there's a plot of getting ahead than on a bad day.Rate it:

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any port in a stormAn unfavourable option which might well be avoided in good times but which nevertheless looks better than the alternatives at the current time.Rate it:

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calm before the stormA period of peace before a disturbance or crisis; an unnatural or false calm before a storm.Rate it:

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perfect stormA powerful hurricane or other major weather disturbance, especially as produced by a combination of meteorological conditions.Rate it:

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perfect stormA situation where a calamity is caused by the convergence and amplifying interaction of a number of factors.Rate it:

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storm in a tea-kettleA big fuss made in a small context.Rate it:

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storm out of the blocksTo begin rapidly.Rate it:

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the calm before the stormA period of peace before a disturbance or crisis; an unnatural or false calm before a storm.Rate it:

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up a stormIn a remarkable and exciting manner.Rate it:

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weather the stormTo reach the end of a very difficult situation without too much harm or damage.Rate it:

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take care of the pence and the pounds will take care of themselvesAlternative form of take care of the pennies and the pounds will take care of themselves.Rate it:

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take care of the pennies and the pounds will take care of themselvesIf you take care of little things one at a time, they can add up to big things.1750, Chesterfield, letter 5 Feb. (1932) IV. 1500:Old Mr. Lowndes, the famous Secretary of the Treasury, ?used to say?Take care of the pence, and the pounds will take care of themselves.1912, G. B. Shaw, Pygmalion ii. 132:Take care of the pence and the pounds will take care of themselves is as true of personal habits as of money.1979, R. Cassilis, Arrow of God, iv. xvii.:Little things, Master Mally. Look after the pennies, Master Mally, and the pounds will look after themselves.1999, Rate it:

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take a pewTo take a seat; to sit down.Rate it:

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take away fromTo make something seem not so good or interesting.Rate it:

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take inTo deceive; to hoodwink.Rate it:

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take it up the assTo be the recipient of anal sex.Rate it:

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take offTo remove.Rate it:

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take onTo acquire, bring in, or introduce.Rate it:

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take outAlternative spelling of takeout.Rate it:

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take toTo adapt to; to learn, grasp or master.Rate it:

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take downTo remove something from a wall or similar vertical surface to which it is fixed.Rate it:

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take it to the bankSaid to emphasize that something is known for sure.Rate it:

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take overTo annex a territory by conquest or invasion.Rate it:

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take awayTo leave a memory or impression in one's mind that you think about later.Rate it:

(4.33 / 3 votes)
take offTo absent oneself from work or other responsibility, especially with permission.Rate it:

(4.33 / 3 votes)
take a breatherTo take a break; to pause or relax briefly.Rate it:

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take a crack atTo attempt or try.Rate it:

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take a jokeTo accept a joke at one's expense.Rate it:

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take a standTo assert an opinion or viewpoint; to defend one's point of view or beliefs.Rate it:

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take againstTo stop liking someone. Become unfriendly.Rate it:

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take apartTo dismantle something into it's component pieces.Rate it:

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take backTo retract an earlier statement.Rate it:

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take backTo cause to remember some past event or time.Rate it:

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take backTo regain possession of something.Rate it:

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take offTo become successful, to flourish.Rate it:

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take overTo assume control of something, especially by force; to usurp.Rate it:

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take overTo buy out the ownership of a business.Rate it:

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take overTo appropriate something without permission.Rate it:

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take toTo begin, as a new habit or practice.Rate it:

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take upThat which takes up or tightens; specifically, a device in a sewing machine for drawing up the slack thread as the needle rises, in completing a stitch.Rate it:

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take afterIn appearance or habit.Rate it:

(3.50 / 2 votes)
take offlineDiscuss a sensitive or highly specific topic individually or in a small group away from a larger groupRate it:

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take a leap of faithjump into the fray, gather all one's wits and plunge, take courage and step into the unknown:Rate it:

(3.33 / 3 votes)
take awayTo remove something and put it in a different place.Rate it:

(3.25 / 4 votes)
take inTo receive into your home for the purpose of processing for a fee.Rate it:

(3.25 / 4 votes)
take abackTo surprise or shock; to discomfit.Rate it:

(3.00 / 1 vote)
take apartTo criticise someone.Rate it:

(3.00 / 1 vote)

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