Search results for question of fact

We've found 74 phrases for question of fact:Sort:PopularA - Z


after the factToo late; after something is finished or final.Rate it:

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buy the rumor, sell the factA phrase often cited by stock traders that explains price declines that occur after an anticipated positive event has happened.Rate it:

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fact isactually, in truthRate it:

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in aid to this factIn addition to; and futhermore.Rate it:

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in factActually, in truth.Rate it:

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in factResulting from the actions of parties.Rate it:

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matter of factA fact.Rate it:

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matter of factA more factual correction.Rate it:

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matter of factSomething completely true.Rate it:

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a question ofThe important question is; the necessary question is.Rate it:

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ask the questionUsed other than as an idiom: to ask a given question.Rate it:

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ask the questionTo make an appeal to the umpire against the batsman.Rate it:

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out of the questionImpossible to even contemplate.Rate it:

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pop the questionTo propose marriage.Rate it:

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pop the questionPop the question in the general context refers to requesting for future action in an interpersonal relationship.Rate it:

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popped the questionproposedRate it:

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question markDoubt or uncertainty.Rate it:

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question markThe punctuation mark “?”, used at the end of a sentence to indicate a question..Rate it:

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there are two sides to every questionOne should not make a judgement until one hears the other side.Rate it:

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answer backTo reply to a question at a later time.Rate it:

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fire offTo ask an unexpected question rapidly.Rate it:

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is the pope catholicThe answer to the question is, obviously, resoundingly affirmative.Rate it:

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accident of birthReference to the fact that various benefits or detriments to the life of a person arise from the circumstances into which that person was born, these being entirely beyond his control.Rate it:

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am i right or am i rightRhetorical question from somebody who has stated what they consider to be an unassailable truth.Rate it:

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are you deafA rhetorical question asked to confront a nondeaf interlocutor who has been rudely neglecting to hear something.Rate it:

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ask my arseA common reply to any question; still deemed wit at sea, and formerly at court, under the denomination of selling bargains.Rate it:

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best-kept secretA significant fact or characteristic that is not well-known.Rate it:

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correlation does not imply causation(statistics) The observed correlation between two parameters, say, the growth of a market and the growth of a neighbor's child may, in fact, have nothing to do with each other's causation.Rate it:

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couldn't happen to a nicerSarcastically asserts that those in question thoroughly deserve their fate.Rate it:

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does a bear shit in the woodsRhetorical question in response to a question where the answer is an emphatic yes.Rate it:

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does macy's tell gimbel's(US, dated, colloquial, rhetorical question) A rhetorical question with the implied answer being that competitors do not share business secrets with one another.Rate it:

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does the Pope shit in the woodsRhetorical question in response to a question where the answer is an emphatic yes.Rate it:

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don't look a gift horse in the mouthDo not unappreciatively question a gift or handout too closely.Rate it:

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exception that proves the ruleA form of argument in which the existence of a counterexample to a rule is used to demonstrate the fact that a rule exists.Rate it:

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feel in one's bonesTo sense a fact or to have a strong conviction as a result of one's own practical experience, instinct, or gut feeling.Rate it:

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feet of clayTo say that someone, who appears strong or invincible, in fact has a hidden weak point which could cause their fall.Rate it:

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fill in the blankA type of question or phrase with one or more words replaced with a blank line, giving the reader the chance to add the missing word(s).Rate it:

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hands downWithout question[2].Rate it:

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he who smelt it dealt it(colloquial, originally) A person who calls attention to or complains about a fart is likely trying to pretend it wasn't his or her own.(colloquial, by extension) Used to suggest that a person calling attention to or complaining about a given problem may in fact be the source of the problem.Rate it:

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hit the nail on the head!To do something perfectly, to give a textbook answer to a question that shows you grasp the concept at hand.Rate it:

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horse pillA fact, proposal, claim, etc. that is difficult to accept or believe.Rate it:

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how do i get to carnegie hallA set phrase, spoken as a rhetorical question, which is answered "Practice, practice, practice!" or sometimes with the humorous literal directions to Seventh Avenue between 56th and 57th.Rate it:

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in controlWhen one is controlling a machine, or a situation, or an activity. Similar to in charge, but one person can be officially in charge, while another person is, in fact, in control.Rate it:

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it goes to showA phrase used to say that: this recent fact or result confirms what we always thought.Rate it:

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it is what it isThis circumstance is simply a fact and must be accepted or dealt with as it exists.Rate it:

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neither here nor thereNot important; having no significance or influence on the question at hand; not related; not relevant; not germane; not pertinent.Rate it:

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no commentAn "official" refusal to relay any further information, as a response to a newspaper reporter's question.Rate it:

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no smoke without fireIndicative of the fact that gossip or accusations are often substantiated by fact.Rate it:

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on account ofOn account of the fact that: because, since.Rate it:

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painting rocksPointless or futile work organised by the government, supposedly to increase employment but in fact merely disguising the unemployment level.Rate it:

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