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We've found 58 phrases for phrase:Sort:PopularA - Z


stock phraseA phrase frequently or habitually used by a person or group, and thus associated with them.Rate it:

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turn a phraseTo create a particular linguistic expression which is strikingly clear, appropriate, and memorable.Rate it:

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turn of phraseAn artful phrasing of words.Rate it:

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"never mind your mother sonny.... eat your bleedin' orange"I worked with a man from Foulridge, Lancashire for over 35 years who often used this phrase whenever there was a problem and he wasn't sure of the answer!.. Said the phrase came from a "chap I used to work with in Colne... but he didn't know what it meant either"Rate it:

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eff offA censored form of the phrase f** off.Rate it:

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tempus fugittime flies (used as an alternative to this phrase)."Meanwhile, the irreplaceable time escapes", expressing concern that one's limited time is being consumed by something which may have little intrinsic substance or importance at that moment.Rate it:

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vale of tearsA symbolic "valley of tears"; meaning the world and the sorrows felt through life. Similar to the Old Testament Psalm 23's reference to the "valley of the shadow of death", the phrase implies that sadness is part of the physical world (i.e. part of human experience).Rate it:

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you know whatA phrase used to get someone's attention before announcing something.Rate it:

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blame canadaA catch phrase for shifting attention away from a serious social issue by laying responsibility with Canada.Rate it:

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lay downTo sacrifice, especially in the phrase "to lay down one's life.".Rate it:

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till death do us partA common phrase said between the bride and the groom at a Christian wedding, indicating togetherness and commitment.Rate it:

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after Saturday comes SundayA phrase sometimes attributed to fundamentalist Muslims, implying that they wish to kill the Jews, whose sabbath is Saturday, and then the Christians, whose sabbath is Sunday.Rate it:

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age before beautyA phrase said to allow older people to go before younger ones.Rate it:

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and his motherServes as an intensifier for an inclusive noun or phrase such as everyone, anyone, each someone or all someones.Rate it:

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big in japana phrase to describe Western celebrities that have been successful in JapanRate it:

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blanket termA word or phrase that is used to describe multiple groups of related things. The degree of relation may vary. Blanket terms often trade specificity for ease-of-use; in other words, a blanket term by itself gives little detail about the things that it describes or the relationships between them, but is easy to say and remember. Blanket terms often originate as slang, and eventually become integrated into the general vocabulary.Rate it:

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buy the rumor, sell the factA phrase often cited by stock traders that explains price declines that occur after an anticipated positive event has happened.Rate it:

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chestnut(Often "old chestnut") A worn-out meme; a phrase, etc. so often repeated as to have grown tiresome.Rate it:

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cloud nineA state of happiness, elation or bliss; often used in the phrase on cloud nine.Rate it:

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come to papaA phrase used to encourage someone or something to approach.Rate it:

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coug itTo suddenly lose a contest through reversal of fortune, mistakes, or bad judgment. The phrase is analogous to "blow it", or "snatch defeat from the jaws of victory".Rate it:

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crab mentalityA way of thinking best described by the phrase "if I can't have it, neither can you." The metaphor refers to a pot of crabs in which one tries to escape over the side, but is relentlessly pulled down by the others in the pot.Rate it:

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dog in the huntThis is often used erroneously to indicate that one has no stake in the outcome. As such this is a bastardization of two Southern idioms: "no dog in the fight," and "that dog won't hunt." (The latter indicates something is a bad idea or prone to fail.) Use of the phrase "no dog in the hunt" when one wishes to indicate they have no "dog in the fight" will generate funny glances from any Southerners who overhear it.Rate it:

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double entendreA phrase that has two meanings, especially where one is innocent and literal, the other risqué, bawdy, or ironic; an innuendo..Rate it:

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dusty millerA formulaic phrase for a miller, related to the dust generated in the milling process.Rate it:

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Elvis has left the buildingA phrase used to announce the end of a show, usually one performed by an Elvis impersonator.Rate it:

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eye catchingTwo words which may have evolved from the marketing and advertising entities, The phrase says and sees it all, appeals only to the sighted.Rate it:

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f** thisThe phrase emphatically diminishes the activity or event referred to and expresses that the speaker will have no more to do with it.Rate it:

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figure of speechA word or phrase that departs from straightforward, literal language.Rate it:

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fill in the blankA type of question or phrase with one or more words replaced with a blank line, giving the reader the chance to add the missing word(s).Rate it:

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give me liberty or give me deathA set-phrase indicating enormous displeasure at any over-authoritarian policy or law.Rate it:

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goldene hochzeitIt's a German phrase that literally translates to "Golden Wedding", but means that 50th anniversary of someone's wedding.Rate it:

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hang your hat on thatAssume or take credit for an idea, suggestion, phrase, development, creation, invention, proclamation, prediction, accomplishment, result, acceptance at large for your creation, art.performance et al:Rate it:

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have a screw looseA phrase meaning that the subject is insane or irrational.Rate it:

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honest injunA phrase used to emphasize the truth of something.Rate it:

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how do i get to carnegie hallA set phrase, spoken as a rhetorical question, which is answered "Practice, practice, practice!" or sometimes with the humorous literal directions to Seventh Avenue between 56th and 57th.Rate it:

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huckleberryA small amount, as in the phrase huckleberry above a persimmon.Rate it:

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I doA traditional phrase said upon acceptance of marriage.Rate it:

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if looks could killA phrase said upon catching sight of someone's giving you a particularly nasty look of discontent or disapproval.Rate it:

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it goes to showA phrase used to say that: this recent fact or result confirms what we always thought.Rate it:

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ladies firstA phrase encouraging polite gentlemanliness, allowing the ladies to go before the men.Rate it:

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less is moreThat which is less complicated is often better understood and more appreciated than what is more complicated; simplicity is preferable to complexity; brevity in communication is more effective than verbosity.1855, Robert Browning, "Men and Women":Well, less is more, Lucrezia: I am judged.1954, "'Less Is More'," Time, 14 Jun.:The essence of Mies's architectural philosophy is in his famous and sometimes derided phrase, "Less is more." This means, he says, having "the greatest effect with the least means."2007, Gia Kourlas, "Dance Review: An Ordered World Defined With Soothing Spareness," New York Times, 3 Mar. (retrieved 22 Oct. 2008):The program, which features two premieresRate it:

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loaded wordAny word, set phrase or idiom that has strong positive or negative connotations beyond their ordinary definition.Rate it:

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night outSpending the evening away from one's usual residence. The phrase typically implies going to a restaurant, going to watch entertainment, or other types of urban nightlife, starting from about 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. and lasting until approximately 11:00 pm or later.Rate it:

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now you're cookingA phrase, often given in response, meaning that the subject has switched to a more suitable or more efficient approach.Rate it:

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now you're talkingA phrase indicating agreement with a previously stated suggestion to change a course of action.Rate it:

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nudge nudge wink winkA phrase added at the end of the sentence to hint that the speaker is referring to something else, euphemistically.Rate it:

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of courseAcknowledges the validity of the associated phrase.Rate it:

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of courseAsserts that the associated phrase should not be argued, particularly if it is obvious or there is no choice in the matter.Rate it:

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on tenterhookstense in anticipation of something. The phrase originated in the wool industry where fleeces were stretched on a frame between hooks to dry after washing the fleeces.Rate it:

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