Search results for little

We've found 65 phrases for little:Sort:PopularA - Z


little pitcherA child.
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every little helpsEven the smallest things are helpful when towards a goal.
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a little bird told meOf information which was gathered from a source not to be overtly exposed.
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and your little dog tooA statement that not only will the person being addressed be punished but their conspirators will also.
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little pitchers have big earsSmall children often overhear more of what is said than adults realize or desire.1844, Charlotte M. Yonge, Abbeychurch, ch. 2:Seeing me listening to something she was saying to Mamma, she turned round upon me with that odious proverb, "Little pitchers have long ears."1939, "Bedtime Bedlam," Time, 17 Apr.:A caution to U. S. parents, but a joy to radio merchandising, is the dread truth that little pitchers have big ears.2002, Stephen King, On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft, ISBN 9780743455961, p. 185:I suppose he might say pushed or went woowoo, but took a shit is, I fear, very much in the ballpark (little pitchers have big ears, after all).
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little pitchers have long earsAlternative form of little pitchers have big ears.
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great oaks from little acorns growAlternative form of mighty oaks from little acorns grow.
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mighty oaks from little acorns growSomething great can come from a modest beginning.Don't give up on the project - mighty oaks from little acorns grow!
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slip into something a little more comfortableTo wear something suitable to be stripped off by a lover.
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fly off the handlegetting angry for a small little thing
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all talk and no actionSpeaking, promising, or boasting much, but doing little
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hack intoTo gain unauthorized entry to, particularly by exploiting little-known weaknesses.
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hiding to nothingA situation in which victory has little or no value, but defeat has a huge cost.
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phase inTo introduce something little by little.
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phase outTo remove or relinquish the use of something little by little.
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the fucking you get isn't worth the fucking you get(vulgar) The sexual satisfactions that one receives from a spouse or romantic partner are not sufficient to compensate for the significant periods of bad faith and unpleasant treatment which such relationships routinely involve.1971, Allen Churchill, The Literary Decade, ISBN 9780135375228:Years later she expressed her disillusionment with sex by saying, "The fucking you get isn't worth the fucking you get."1999, Ben Sonnenberg, Lost Property: Memoirs and Confessions of a Bad Boy, ISBN 9781582430454, p. 93:Maitland got drunk at his parties and threw his arm around you and pulled you over to his wife and made you look down her dress, saying, "The trouble with marriage is that the fucking you get isn't worth the fucking you get."2008, Joseph Heywood, Blue Wolf In Green Fire, ISBN 9781599213590, p. 63:"I can't believe a little pussy got me into dis mess." "Shit happens," Service said. "Sometimes the fucking you get isn't worth the fucking you get."
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a drop in the bucketAn effort or action having very little overall influence, especially as compared to a huge problem.
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a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go downAn otherwise unpleasant situation can be pleasant when a pleasant aspect is deliberately introduced.1999, Eli Yassif, The Hebrew Folktale: History, Genre, Meaning, Indiana University Press, ISBN 0253335833, page 372,One is known as the "sweetening parable," that is to say a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down. Thus, when the aim is to preach to the people, to guide them along the "bitter," arduous path of upholding burdensome precepts and prohibitions, a tale can lighten the load, make the "medicine" easier "to swallow."2001, Maureen Reagan, First Father, First Daughter: A Memoir, Little, Brown, ISBN 0316736368, page 319,It put some fun into the tedious business of preparing for a presidential debate. A spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down, right?2004, John Hoover, How to Work for an Idiot: Survive & Thrive... Without Killing Your Boss, Career Press, ISBN 1564147045, page 11,If a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down, a barrel of laughs can wash down the big pills you might need to swallow.
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big fish in a small pondOne who has achieved a high rank or is highly esteemed, but only in a small, relatively unimportant, or little known location or organization.
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blanket termA word or phrase that is used to describe multiple groups of related things. The degree of relation may vary. Blanket terms often trade specificity for ease-of-use; in other words, a blanket term by itself gives little detail about the things that it describes or the relationships between them, but is easy to say and remember. Blanket terms often originate as slang, and eventually become integrated into the general vocabulary.
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bright-line ruleA clearly defined rule or standard, comprised of objective factors, which leaves little or no room for varying interpretation.
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chump-changeOf or pertaining to something of little monetary value.
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eat someone out of house and homeTo consume such a portion of one's store of food that little is left for the owner.
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every cloud has a silver liningIn every bad situation there is an element of good1881, National Academy of Code Administration (U.S.), Folio, page 417:Every cloud has a silver lining; but in the old-fashioned meeting-houses every cloud of hymnal melody generally had a nasal lining before the congregation...1887, Shakers, Religion, page 36:that "a little reserve and thou'lt fail surely," will prove to be true in our experience. Every cloud has a silver lining and so has every sorrow,1918, George Jean Nathan, Performing Arts, page 222:But the most popular attitude toward what we may call "sad" plays is the peculiar one of believing that, since every cloud has a silver lining,
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f** allNothing at all or very little.
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fat chanceLittle or no likelihood of occurrence or success.
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go by the boardTo be superseded, rejected, or obliterated; to pass by with little consequence; to amount to nothing.
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gravy trainAn occupation or any lucrative endeavor that generates considerable income whilst requiring little effort and carrying little risk.
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kick up a fussTo show annoyance, or to complain loudly about something, often when it is of little importance in reality.
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lay a finger onIf you lay a finger on my little brother, I'll have your guts for garters.
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leave nothing to the imaginationTo cover or hide very little or nothing.
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licence to print moneyA means of generating a large income with little effort.
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life's a bitchAn expression of acceptance of misfortune.1950, Joy Davidman, Weeping Bay, page 184:She'd have been willing enough to use them, poor dead little bitch. Life's a bitch. Life's a bad joke.
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lift a fingerTo make minimal effort; to help as little as possible.
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long shotSomething unlikely; something that has little chance of happening or working. The term arose from the accuracy of early ship guns, which were effective only at close range and unlikely to hit the mark at any great distance.
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man of partsA man that is talented in multiple areas of life. This includes but is not limited to the area of seduction. He puts very little emphasis on memorized scripts or "peacocking" and instead relies on individualized ways to charm a woman.
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much of a muchnessOf two or more things, having little difference of any significance between them.
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├▒apathe little something extra
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no slave to fashionA person whose style of clothing and appearance are unconventional, informal, or slovenly; a person who takes little interest in how he or she is dressed.
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not much of anythingVery little; not a lot.
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on a shoestringOn a very tight budget; with few resources or little money.
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outsiderA competitor or contestant who has little chance of winning; a long shot; a dark horse.
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outsiderA newcomer with little or no experience in an organization or community.
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penny pincherOne who spends little money; one who is very frugal or cautious with money.
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pinchpennyOne who spends little money; one who is very frugal or cautious with money.
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put someone down asTo assume someone has a particular character from very little information.
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run on fumesBy extension, to operate with few resources or little money.
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shot in the darkA guess, attempt, or choice made with little or no evidence or knowledge.
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slim chanceLittle or no likelihood of occurrence or success.
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small fryOne or more persons or things of relatively little consequence, importance, or value.
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